Web-Based Family Intervention for Overweight Children: A Pilot Study.

Web-Based Family Intervention for Overweight Children: A Pilot Study.

Filed under: Eating Disorders

Child Obes. 2013 Jan 11;
Delamater AM, Pulgaron ER, Rarback S, Hernandez J, Carrillo A, Christiansen S, Severson HH

Abstract Background: Research has shown the efficacy of family-based behavioral interventions for overweight children, but a major difficulty is access to effective treatment programs. The objective of this study was to develop and test the initial feasibility and efficacy of a web-based family program for overweight 8- to 12-year-old children. Methods: A website was created using concepts from effective family-based behavioral programs and input from focus groups with overweight children, parents, and pediatricians. The website provided information about obesity and healthy lifestyles, assessment of dietary and physical activity habits, interactive dietary and physical activity games, and instruction in goal-setting and monitoring of goals. Children selected a dietary and physical activity goal and a daily step goal with pedometers. Feasibility and pilot testing over 4 weeks was conducted with 24 overweight children referred by a physician. Outcomes were z-BMI, healthy eating and physical activity, and intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy for weight control. Results: Mean number of logins over the study period was 11.4 for the study sample. Eighteen families (75%) returned for the follow-up assessment. Pre-post analyses for these participants showed improvements in intrinsic motivation, (p=0.05), self-efficacy (p=0.025), physical activity (p=0.005), and healthy lifestyle behaviors (p=0.001). Comparisons between high and low users of the program indicated that high users reduced their BMI while low users increased their BMI over time (p=0.02); high users also improved their dietary intake relative to low users (p=0.04). Consumer satisfaction ratings were high. Conclusion: These pilot findings suggest this is a feasible approach for treatment of overweight children and that children who used the web program frequently improved their BMI and dietary intake.
HubMed – eating

 

Socioeconomic determinants of eating pattern of adolescent students in Mansoura, Egypt.

Filed under: Eating Disorders

Pan Afr Med J. 2012; 13: 22
El-Gilany AH, Elkhawaga G

During the last few decades, Egypt experienced rapid socio-cultural changes that were associated with major changes in the food choices and eating habits, which, progressively, becomes more westernized. The objective of this study was to investigate the meal patterns of secondary school adolescent students in Mansoura, Egypt.This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 891 adolescent students. Thirty clusters were selected to cover both general and vocational public schools of both sexes in urban and rural areas. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data about sociodemographic features of the students and their families, as well as meal habits of students.About 46% of students eat three meals per day. About 72%, 93% and 95% of respondents consume breakfast, lunch and dinner on daily bases, respectively. Snacks were eaten daily by 34.1% of students. Eating always with the family was stated by the majority (62.5%) of students and taking home made sandwiches during school time was mentioned by 35.8% of students. On logistic regression socioeconomic status is the only predictor associated with daily intake of breakfast, lunch and dinner; with high likelihood of eating with the family and intake of school meal.Students practice many faulty meal patterns. School-, family- and community-based interventions are timely needed to promote healthy eating habit in adolescents.
HubMed – eating

 

Secretion of gastrointestinal hormones and eating control.

Filed under: Eating Disorders

J Anim Sci. 2013 Jan 10;
Steinert RE, Feinle-Bisset C, Geary N, Beglinger C

Nutrient ingestion triggers numerous changes in gastrointestinal (GI) peptide hormone secretion that affect appetite and eating. Evidence for these effects comes from research in laboratory animals, healthy humans, and, increasingly, obese patients after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, which has marked effects on GI hormone function and is currently the most effective therapy for morbid obesity. Increases in cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (3-36) (PYY(3-36)) and decreases in ghrelin secretion after meals are triggered by changes in the nutrient content of the intestine. One apparent physiological function of each is to initiate a reflex-like feedback control of eating. Here we briefly review this function, with an emphasis on the controls of their secretion. Each is secreted from enteroendocrine cells that are directly or indirectly affected by caloric load, macronutrient composition, and other characteristics of ingested food such as fatty acid chain length. In addition, digestive hydrolysis is a critical mechanism that controls their secretion. Although there are relatively few data in agricultural animals, the generally consistent results across widely divergent mammals suggests that most of the processes described are also likely to be relevant to GI hormone functions and eating in agricultural animals.
HubMed – eating

 

Differential effect of glucose ingestion on the neural processing of food stimuli in lean and overweight adults.

Filed under: Eating Disorders

Hum Brain Mapp. 2013 Jan 10;
Heni M, Kullmann S, Ketterer C, Guthoff M, Bayer M, Staiger H, Machicao F, Häring HU, Preissl H, Veit R, Fritsche A

Eating behavior is crucial in the development of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. To further investigate its regulation, we studied the effects of glucose versus water ingestion on the neural processing of visual high and low caloric food cues in 12 lean and 12 overweight subjects by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found body weight to substantially impact the brain’s response to visual food cues after glucose versus water ingestion. Specifically, there was a significant interaction between body weight, condition (water versus glucose), and caloric content of food cues. Although overweight subjects showed a generalized reduced response to food objects in the fusiform gyrus and precuneus, the lean group showed a differential pattern to high versus low caloric foods depending on glucose versus water ingestion. Furthermore, we observed plasma insulin and glucose associated effects. The hypothalamic response to high caloric food cues negatively correlated with changes in blood glucose 30 min after glucose ingestion, while especially brain regions in the prefrontal cortex showed a significant negative relationship with increases in plasma insulin 120 min after glucose ingestion. We conclude that the postprandial neural processing of food cues is highly influenced by body weight especially in visual areas, potentially altering visual attention to food. Furthermore, our results underline that insulin markedly influences prefrontal activity to high caloric food cues after a meal, indicating that postprandial hormones may be potential players in modulating executive control. Hum Brain Mapp, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
HubMed – eating

 


 

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