Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis.

Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis.

Filed under: Depression Treatment

Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2012; 12(4): 1-50

In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions.AFTER AN INITIAL REVIEW OF HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS AND SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS OF COPD LITERATURE, AND CONSULTATION WITH EXPERTS, MAS IDENTIFIED THE FOLLOWING TOPICS FOR ANALYSIS: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses.The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html.Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary FrameworkInfluenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisSmoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisCommunity-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisPulmonary Rehabilitation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisLong-term Oxygen Therapy for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisNoninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisNoninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Chronic Respiratory Failure Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisHospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisHome Telehealth for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based AnalysisCost-Effectiveness of Interventions for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using an Ontario Policy ModelEXPERIENCES OF LIVING AND DYING WITH COPD: A Systematic Review and Synthesis of the Qualitative Empirical LiteratureFOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE QUALITATIVE REVIEW, PLEASE CONTACT MITA GIACOMINI AT: http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/ceb/faculty member_giacomini.htm.FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, PLEASE VISIT THE PATH WEBSITE: http://www.path-hta.ca/About-Us/Contact-Us.aspx.The Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) collaborative has produced an associated report on patient preference for mechanical ventilation. For more information, please visit the THETA website: http://theta.utoronto.ca/static/contact.The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CLINICAL NEED: CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Tobacco smoking is the main risk factor for COPD. It is estimated that 50% of older smokers develop COPD and more than 80% of COPD-associated morbidity is attributed to tobacco smoking. According to the Canadian Community Health Survey, 38.5% of Ontarians who smoke have COPD. In patients with a significant history of smoking, COPD is usually present with symptoms of progressive dyspnea (shortness of breath), cough, and sputum production. Patients with COPD who smoke have a particularly high level of nicotine dependence, and about 30.4% to 43% of patients with moderate to severe COPD continue to smoke. Despite the severe symptoms that COPD patients suffer, the majority of patients with COPD are unable to quit smoking on their own; each year only about 1% of smokers succeed in quitting on their own initiative. TECHNOLOGY: Smoking cessation is the process of discontinuing the practice of inhaling a smoked substance. Smoking cessation can help to slow or halt the progression of COPD. Smoking cessation programs mainly target tobacco smoking, but may also encompass other substances that can be difficult to stop smoking due to the development of strong physical addictions or psychological dependencies resulting from their habitual use. Smoking cessation strategies include both pharmacological and nonpharmacological (behavioural or psychosocial) approaches. The basic components of smoking cessation interventions include simple advice, written self-help materials, individual and group behavioural support, telephone quit lines, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), and antidepressants. As nicotine addiction is a chronic, relapsing condition that usually requires several attempts to overcome, cessation support is often tailored to individual needs, while recognizing that in general, the more intensive the support, the greater the chance of success. Success at quitting smoking decreases in relation to: a lack of motivation to quit,a history of smoking more than a pack of cigarettes a day for more than 10 years,a lack of social support, such as from family and friends, andthe presence of mental health disorders (such as depression).What are the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions compared with usual care for patients with COPD?A literature search was performed on June 24, 2010 using OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations (1950 to June Week 3 2010), EMBASE (1980 to 2010 Week 24), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination for studies published between 1950 and June 2010. A single reviewer reviewed the abstracts and obtained full-text articles for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search. Data were extracted using a standardized data abstraction form.English-language, full reports from 1950 to week 3 of June, 2010;either randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews and meta-analyses, or non-RCTs with controls;a proven diagnosis of COPD;adult patients (? 18 years);a smoking cessation intervention that comprised at least one of the treatment arms;? 6 months’ abstinence as an outcome; andpatients followed for ? 6 months.case reportscase series OUTCOMES OF INTEREST: ? 6 months’ abstinenceThe quality of each included study was assessed taking into consideration allocation concealment, randomization, blinding, power/sample size, withdrawals/dropouts, and intention-to-treat analyses. The quality of the body of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low, or very low according to the GRADE Working Group criteria. The following definitions of quality were used in grading the quality of the evidence: HighFurther research is very unlikely to change confidence in the estimate of effect.ModerateFurther research is likely to have an important impact on confidence in the estimate of effect and may change the estimate.LowFurther research is very likely to have an important impact on confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate.Very LowAny estimate of effect is very uncertain.Nine RCTs were identified from the literature search. The sample sizes ranged from 74 to 5,887 participants. A total of 8,291 participants were included in the nine studies. The mean age of the patients in the studies ranged from 54 to 64 years. The majority of studies used the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) COPD staging criteria to stage the disease in study subjects. Studies included patients with mild COPD (2 studies), mild-moderate COPD (3 studies), moderate-severe COPD (1 study) and severe-very severe COPD (1 study). One study included persons at risk of COPD in addition to those with mild, moderate, or severe COPD, and 1 study did not define the stages of COPD. The individual quality of the studies was high. Smoking cessation interventions varied across studies and included counselling or pharmacotherapy or a combination of both. Two studies were delivered in a hospital setting, whereas the remaining 7 studies were delivered in an outpatient setting. All studies reported a usual care group or a placebo-controlled group (for the drug-only trials). The follow-up periods ranged from 6 months to 5 years. Due to excessive clinical heterogeneity in the interventions, studies were first grouped into categories of similar interventions; statistical pooling was subsequently performed, where appropriate. When possible, pooled estimates using relative risks for abstinence rates with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The remaining studies were reported separately. ABSTINENCE RATES: Table ES1 provides a summary of the pooled estimates for abstinence, at longest follow-up, from the trials included in this review. It also shows the respective GRADE qualities of evidence. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)
HubMed – depression

 

Phenazepam and its Effects on Driving.

Filed under: Depression Treatment

J Anal Toxicol. 2012 Oct 16;
Stephenson JB, Golz DE, Brasher MJ

Phenazepam use in the state of Georgia has increasingly become a trend for a drug market looking at new and different recreational drugs. This paper examines the psychomotor effects of phenazepam on individuals and their ability to operate a motor vehicle. This study reviewed phenazepam cases of impaired drivers that were submitted to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation’s Division of Forensic Sciences between March, 2010, and August, 2011. A total of 11 cases were reviewed, of which five had only phenazepam detected and six had multiple drugs detected in addition to phenazepam. Concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 3.2 mg/L, with a median of 0.17 mg/L and a mean of 0.50 mg/L (0.23 mg/L, excluding the 3.2 mg/L blood concentration). The observed effects where symptomatic of central nervous system depression with slurred speech, lack of balance, slow reactions, drowsiness and confusion. This review indicates that the use of phenazepam at concentrations similar to other low-dose benzodiazepines such as clonazepam can have a significant impact on an individual’s ability to drive.
HubMed – depression

 

The psychopathological influence of congenital heart disease in korean male adolescents: an analysis of multiphasic personal inventory test results.

Filed under: Depression Treatment

Yonsei Med J. 2012 Nov 1; 53(6): 1107-12
Oh CH, Lim HK, Chung J, Yoon SH, Park HC, Park CO

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychopathological influence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in Korean 19-year-old males. Materials and Methods: The authors compared the Korean military multiphasic personal inventory (KMPI) military profiles of 211 CHD cases (atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, or combined CHD) with the KMPI profiles of 300 normal controls. The CHD group was also divided according to whether or not the subjects had undergone open cardiac surgery in order to evaluate the psychopathological effects of an operation among the subjects. Results: A decreased result on the faking-good response scale and an increased result on the faking-bad response were observed in the CHD group compared to the control (p<0.01). The neurosis scale results, including anxiety, depression and somatization symptoms, were markedly increased in the CHD group compared to the control (p<0.01). The severity level of personality disorder was also increased in the CHD group (p<0.001). Differences in KMPI scale scores were not related to open cardiac surgery history. Conclusion: In this study, young males with CHD tended to report more abnormal results on the multiphasic personal inventory test in comparison to normal subjects, suggesting that CHD may be related to psychopathology in young males in Korea. Therefore, clinicians are recommended to evaluate the psychopathological traits of patients with CHD. HubMed – depression

 

The Complete Depression Treatment and Homework Planner by Arthur E. Jr. Jongsma

$70.89
End Date: Monday Nov-18-2019 6:19:13 PST
Buy It Now for only: $70.89
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

 

The Psychological Treatment of Depression: A Gu, Williams-,
$63.97
End Date: Sunday Dec-1-2019 4:34:22 PST
Buy It Now for only: $63.97
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

 

Treatment of Depression and Related Moods : A Manual for... (ExLib)
$6.84
End Date: Saturday Nov-30-2019 18:00:33 PST
Buy It Now for only: $6.84
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

 

Find More Depression Treatment Information…